Townhouse Quilt

What I Learned From The Townhouse Quilt (Part 4)

Good Afternoon!  It has consistently been in the 20-40 range for the last week here in Washington and last night it snowed and stuck!  So with a beautiful snow day and some coffee here I am to finish up this four part series.

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#16 – How people either love or hate machine embroidery.

As I started finishing up this project I ended up taking it with me to a couple of places to see what people had to say about my progress.  Eight out of ten would usually say they loved it, were really interested in how it was coming together, or that they wanted to try it if they had an embroidery machine of their own.  The other two would be traditionalists who would say it was pretty but they thought I was cheating because my machine was doing most of the work.  I am not really sure which side of the fence I stand, but I have had my own doubts about this craft as well.  All of which has been smothered with practice and gaining more knowledge and skills.

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#17 – How to use sashing on a quilt as you go project.

As I talked about in Part 1 I am not great with reading directions.  So when I began this project I did not understand that I was supposed to leave half an inch around all sides of the fabric (not the batting).  This led me to an interesting predicament when it came time for me to decide on adding the sashing, the fabric between each block.  I decided that since my buildings were black I would use the coordinating fairy frost.  Each block had a quarter each seam around the edges that would be hidden underneath the sashing.  To keep the sashing from overpowering the quilt I cut one inch strips out of the fabric and began the assembly.  Once each piece of sashing was added the finished size amounted to half an inch and I did not need to add extra bating under the sashing pieces.  This made each square lay flat and beautiful.

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#18 – How many needles I needed for this project.

If there is anything in my sewing room I am OCD about it is 1)That my needles get changed regularly 2)That my machine gets cleaned after every single project 3)That my thread is all tucked away in their correct places 4)That I can quickly reach all of my must haves for embroidery.  That being said when it came down to trial and error the final number of needles I used for this project totalled around 10-12.  I do not have a firm number because I would do other small projects in between my blocks.  One needle would usually stay nice and sharp for two whole blocks.  If I kept it longer I would be able to immediately tell from the sound it made when passing through the fabric.

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#19 – How many bobbins I used

I used one bobbin per block which totalled 20 bobbins.  I can’t remember how much thread my bobbin will hold, but I did go through one and a half spools of bobbin thread.  So that is approximately 1,312 yards (1,199 metres) of thread.  That is a ton of thread….but it is so worth it.

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#20 – How much I really loved this project

I don’t think I can say enough how much I loved this project.  It was challenging, fun, stressful, rewarding, and I have learned so much from this project I am anxious to begin my next journey.  Please see the finished project below.

 

Thank you so much for following me through this list and I really hope everyone can learn something from my experiences.

If you have landed on this post and would like to read the whole list please start with Part 1, Part 2, or Part 3

Happy Sewing, Crocheting, Embroidery, Quilting or whatever craft you enjoy!

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